Area Real Estate News & Market Trends

You’ll find our blog to be a wealth of information, covering everything from local market statistics and home values to community happenings. That’s because we care about the community and want to help you find your place in it. Please reach out if you have any questions at all. We’d love to talk with you!

Feb. 13, 2018

Importance of Pre-Approval

Posted in Buyer Info
Jan. 22, 2018


Radon Fact Sheet

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the Surgeon General’s Office have estimated that as many as 20,000 lung cancer deaths are caused each year by radon. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Radon-induced lung cancer costs the United States over $2 billion dollars per year in both direct and indirect health care costs. (Based on National Cancer Institute statistics of 14,400 annual radon lung cancer deaths – Oster, Colditz & Kelley, 1984)

According to the US EPA, nearly 1 in 3 homes checked in seven states and on three Indian lands had screening levels over 4 pCi/L, the EPA’s recommended action level for radon exposure.

The alpha radiation emitted by radon is the same alpha radiation emitted by other alpha generating radiation sources such as plutonium.

A family whose home has radon levels of 4 pCi/L is exposed to approximately 35 times as much radiation as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission would allow if that family was standing next to the fence of a radioactive waste site. (25 mrem limit, 800 mrem exposure)

An elementary school student that spends 8 hours per day and 180 days per year in a classroom with 4 pCi/L of radon will receive nearly 10 times as much radiation as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission allows at the edge of a nuclear power plant. (25 mrem limit, 200 mrem exposure)

Most U.S. EPA lifetime safety standards for carcinogens are established based on a 1 in 100,000 risk of death. Most scientists agree that the risk of death for radon at 4 pCi/L is approximately 1 in 100. At the 4 pCi/L EPA action guideline level, radon carries approximately 1000 times the risk of death as any other EPA carcinogen. It is important to note that the action level is not a safe level, as there are no “safe” levels of radon gas.

What is radon?

A layman’s description

Radon is a cancer-causing radioactive gas. You cannot see, smell or taste radon, but it may be a problem in your home. The Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, you’re at high risk for developing lung cancer. Some scientific studies of radon exposure indicate that children may be more sensitive to radon. This may be due to their higher respiration rate and their rapidly dividing cells, which may be more vulnerable to radiation damage.

A scientific description

PROPERTIES: Radon is a gaseous highly radioactive element discovered by English physicist Ernest Rutherford in 1899. The discovery is also credited to German physicist Friedrich Ernst Dorn in 1900. More specifically, Rutherford discovered radon’s alpha radiation and Dorn discovered that radium was releasing a gas.

Radon is a colorless chemically-unreactive inert gas. The atomic radius is 1.34 angstroms and it is the heaviest known gas–radon is nine times denser than air. Because it is a single atom gas (unlike oxygen, O2, which is comprised of two atoms) it easily penetrates many common materials like paper, leather, low-density plastic (like plastic bags, etc.) most paints, and building materials like gypsum board (sheetrock), concrete block, mortar, sheathing paper (tar paper), wood paneling, and most insulations.

Radon is also fairly soluble in water and organic solvents. Although reaction with other compounds is comparatively rare, it is not completely inert and forms stable molecules with highly electronegative materials. Radon is considered a noble gas that occurs in several isotopic forms. Only two are found in significant concentrations in the human environment: radon-222, and radon-220. Radon-222 is a member of the radioactive decay chain of uranium-238. Radon-220 is formed in the decay chain of thorium-232. Radon-222 decays in a sequence of radionuclides called radon decay products, radon daughters, or radon progeny. It is radon-222 that most readily occurs in the environment. Atmospheric releases of radon-222 results in the formation of decay products that are radioisotopes of heavy metals (polonium, lead, bismuth) and rapidly attach to other airborne materials such as dust and other materials facilitating inhalation.

USE: Radon has been used in some spas for presumed medical effects. In addition, radon is used to initiate and influence chemical reactions and as a surface label in the study of surface reactions. It has been obtained by pumping the gasses off of a solution of a radium salt, sparking the gas mixture to combine the hydrogen and oxygen, removing the water and carbon dioxide by adsorption, and freezing out the radon.

PRODUCTION: Radon is not produced as a commercial product. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas and comes from the natural breakdown (radioactive decay) of uranium. It is usually found in igneous rock and soil, but in some cases, well water may also be a source of radon.

EXPOSURE: The primary routes of potential human exposure to radon are inhalation and ingestion. Radon in the ground, groundwater, or building materials enters working and living spaces and disintegrates into its decay products. Although high concentrations of radon in groundwater may contribute to radon exposure through ingestion, the inhalation of radon released from water is usually more important.

RADON IN THE WORKPLACE: In comparison with levels in outdoor air, humans in confined air spaces, particularly in underground work areas such as mines and buildings, are exposed to elevated concentrations of radon and its decay products. Exhalation of radon from ordinary rock and soils and from radon-rich water can cause significant radon concentrations in tunnels, power stations, caves, public baths, and spas. The average radon concentrations in houses are generally much lower than the average radon concentrations in underground ore mines.

Workers are exposed to radon in several occupations. In countries for which data were available, concentrations of radon decay products in underground mines are now typically less than 1000 Bq/m3 EEC Rn (approx. 28 pCi/L). Underground uranium miners are exposed to the highest levels of radon and its decay products. Other underground workers and certain mineral processing workers may also be exposed to significant levels.

Should you test for radon?

Testing is the only way to know your home’s radon levels. There are no immediate symptoms that will alert you to the presence of radon. It typically takes years of exposure before any problems surface. The US EPA, Surgeon General, American Lung Association, American Medical Association, and National Safety Council recommend testing your home for radon because testing is the only way to know your home’s radon levels.

Radon is a national environmental health problem. Elevated radon levels have been discovered in every state. The US EPA estimates that as many as 8 million homes throughout the country have elevated levels of radon. Current state surveys show that 1 home in 5 has elevated radon levels.

Can you fix the problem?

If your home has high concentrations of radon there are ways to reduce it to acceptable levels. Most radon problems can be fixed by a do-it-yourselfer for less than $700. If you want or require the assistance of a professional you may wish to look at the list of certified radon mitigators for your state.

Posted in Around the House
Jan. 9, 2018

10 Most Common Home Inspection Problems of 2017

Our friends at Scott Home Inspection,  find a wide range of problems during their home inspections. These issues can range from major structural problems to minor cosmetic scratches. Sometimes they will find something that makes us wonder “How is that even possible?” But those are the kinds of issues that make our day interesting and fun! After performing 4000 home inspections in 2017, Scott Home Inspections have compiled a list of the 10 most common home inspection problems that we identified this last year

#10: Deck Staining

 Periodic maintenance on decks and hand-railing areas is often neglected. Warping of the material can occur without proper coating and protection. Often cleaning alone and re-staining may be sufficient, but occasionally a complete sanding and re-finishing is needed.

 #9: Missing GFCI Outlets

GFCI protection outlets should be installed in wet locations, such as bathrooms and kitchens, and in garages and basements. While this was not always a requirement, it is a recommended upgrade when noted. This makes it on the list of common home inspection problems because many homes are older, and were built before they required GFCIs in these locations. Want to learn more about GFCI outlets? Read our article here.

#8: Crawlspace Vapor Barriers

Moisture can enter a home through the soil in a crawlspace. Crawlspace venting was added to newer homes to relieve this concern, but many homes have insulated crawlspaces with sealed-off vents, and improper coverage of the soil. Plastic sheet vapor barriers provide a block to trap moisture in the soil and prevent it from coming into the crawlspace.

#7: Furnace – Filter/Cleaning/Service

Furnace cleaning and service is often neglected, and filter replacement is rarely performed regularly. While the furnace may operate properly, a service check-up is often recommended.


 #6: Roots in the Sewer Line

Sewer Scope inspections on older homes often reveal root intrusion in the main sewer line. Cutting and cleaning of the line is often needed, in order to re-scope the line. Then it is possible to look for cracks and offsets. Main sewer line issues can occur at any time, so it is a good idea to have your sewer line scoped regularly. For more information on our sewer scope service, click here.


#5: Electric Panel Issues

Several older brands of panels were installed in homes in our area requiring replacement, such as Federal Pacific and Zinsco. Other improper issues such as double-tapping, missing labeling, or aluminum wiring is occasionally noted, requiring an electrician to repair. Once again, older electrical components made it on the list of common home inspection problems.


#4: Concrete Cracks/Settlement  

With our clay-soils in Colorado, concrete settlement is common. Most concrete is non-structural, and most cracks are not significant enough to require repair. Mud-jacking and other options exist, aside from replacement when cracking is noted. Mud jacking is a powerful process. You can learn more about it in this video.

  #3: Roof Defects

Most homeowners don’t usually walk on their roofs, or have it inspected, unless a leak develops. We often see hail damage, missing shingles, or cracks –  all which call for repair or possible roof replacement.


#2: Water Heater Issues  

The water heater is one of the most neglected devices in the home, and is only addressed once a leak develops. Severe rusting is common on older water heaters, indicating replacement is over-due.

#1: Gutters, Downspouts, Drainage Issues

Did you guess it? Poor drainage of gutters and downspouts can cause associated structural issues, moisture problems, and concrete settlement issues. This is a small and easy fix but can cause major problems if not addressed. This is by far the most common home inspection issue that we find. Downspout extensions are not the most attractive things, and they can easily get in the way. However, their ability to carry drainage away from the foundation of a home should not be overlooked.

 Anything Surprise You?

Nothing too exciting on the most common home inspection problems list. Many of these issues are easily fixable. Remember, there is a solution to every defect we find in a home. Our job is just to make sure you are not surprised by them~

Scott Inspection and Keenan Real Estate will make sure you are covered.


Posted in Buyer Info
Jan. 5, 2018

Mid Century Modern in Denver for Sale

Find more info here. CLICK

Posted in Buyer Info
Dec. 29, 2017

We have the greatest Clients 2017 Year in Review


Home is where our most cherished memories are made.  Where the stories of our lives are fashioned and held close.  As a reflection of our dreams and aspirations, home is the most personal of places.

So we feel very privileged to have assisted many sellers and buyers in 2018 and that you have invited us into your lives and homes.  We pray that God will bless you and your families with a wonderful year filled with happiness, heartfelt warmth and many magical moments.   

Thank you, Thank you!  Have an amazing 2018!


Posted in Family First
Dec. 26, 2017

5 Ways The Tax Bill Will Affect Homeownership And Mortgages

Expect some big changes if you own your home in 2018.

Will the new tax law save you money or cost you money? The answer depends on a complex array of factors that touch on just about every aspect of your financial life. This article is about a subset of your finances: How the tax law will affect homeownership and mortgages.
Among other things, the tax law changes whether and how homeowners deduct mortgage interest and property taxes. Many of these revisions for individuals and families are set to expire at the end of 2025.
Here are five elements of the tax law that could affect homeownership, home selling and moving.
1. Mortgage Interest Deduction
The mortgage interest tax deduction is touted as a way to make homeownership more affordable. It cuts the federal income tax that qualifying homeowners pay by reducing their taxable income by the amount of mortgage interest they pay. Beginning in 2018, the deduction is scaled back to interest on debt up to $750,000, instead of $1 million, for people who buy homes on or after Dec. 15, 2017.
The law carves out an exception for people who were under contract to buy a home before Dec. 15, 2017, as long as they were scheduled to close by Jan. 1, 2018.
Another exception: When you refinance a mortgage, the compromise bill treats the new loan as if it were originated on the old loan’s date. That means the old limit of $1 million would apply.
2. Property Tax Deduction
The former tax law eased the pain of paying property taxes by allowing qualifying taxpayers to reduce their taxable income by the total amount of property taxes they paid. Beginning in 2018, the deduction is limited to a total of $10,000 for the cost of property taxes, and state and local income taxes or sales taxes.
3. Home Equity Deduction
On top of the mortgage interest deduction, the former tax law added a deduction for interest paid on home equity debt “for reasons other than to buy, build, or substantially improve your home.” So, for example, if you borrowed from a home equity line of credit to pay tuition, the interest you paid was tax-deductible.
Starting in 2018, the deduction is eliminated for interest paid on home equity debt.
4. Mortgage Interest Deduction For Second Homes
You may deduct interest on mortgage debt on your primary home and a second home. The new law keeps this part of the former tax law in place, although it reduces the amount of eligible mortgage debt, as seen in item No. 1 above.
5. Moving Expenses
Under the former tax law, you could deduct some moving expenses when you moved for a new job. You had to meet complex criteria involving distance and timing of the move.
Beginning in 2018, only active-duty members of the armed forces will be allowed to deduct moving expenses.
Capital Gain Rule Unchanged
When you sell a house, the capital gain is the difference between the price you paid for it and the price you sold it for. This capital gain is treated as taxable income. If you owned the house long enough, you’re allowed to exclude up to $500,000 of this capital gain as income so you don’t have to pay federal income tax on it. (The exclusion is capped at $250,000 for married taxpayers filing separately.)
The new tax law doesn’t alter the capital gain exclusion for homes. The House and Senate had voted to limit the exclusion, but they struck that language from the final bill.
Fewer Taxpayers Would Itemize
The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center estimates that the number of itemizers will fall from about 49 million to 10 million under the new tax law.
The upshot: Under the tax law through 2017, if you’re married filing jointly and you paid $15,000 in mortgage interest and property taxes in 2017, you would itemize those deductions because they exceed the standard deduction of $12,700.
Beginning in 2018, the standard deduction for married filing jointly rises to $24,000. If you’re like the hypothetical family above, your $15,000 in mortgage interest and property taxes is less than the standard deduction. So you won’t itemize. You will use the standard deduction.
Whether you end up paying less tax or more tax depends on a wide range of factors beyond the homeownership-related deductions and exclusions discussed here. Every taxpayer is different.
Realtors Raise A Ruckus
The National Association of Realtors opposed increasing the standard deduction on the grounds that it “would destroy or at least cripple the incentive value of the mortgage interest deduction (MID) for the great majority of current and prospective homebuyers, and sap the incentive value of the property tax deduction for millions more.”
NAR argued that the de-emphasis on itemized deductions would result in “a plunge in home values across America in excess of 10 percent, and likely more in higher cost areas.”
Skeptics challenged the Realtors’ assertion that giving taxpayers a bigger standard deduction would cause home prices to nosedive. Logan Mohtashami, senior loan officer for AMC Lending Group in Irvine, California, says in an interview that there are always “spreadsheet people” who decide whether to rent or buy a home based on tax advantages. “But, in general, people buy homes because they want to raise their family, they want to own something, forced savings”—and not have to deal with a landlord, he says.
Written by Holden Lewis for NerdWallet. Holden Lewis is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: Twitter: @HoldenL.
The article 5 Homeownership Changes Coming Under New Tax Law originally appeared on NerdWallet.
Posted in Seller Info
Dec. 23, 2017

Merry Christmas From Keenan Real Estate

May your Christmas sparkle with moments of love, laughter and goodwill,
and may the year ahead be full of contentment and joy.

Have a Merry Christmas!


Posted in Family First
Dec. 23, 2017

10 Top House-Hunting Mistakes to Avoid

House-hunting is not for the weak of heart. It is more than just calling some real estate agents, seeing a few houses, and moving in right after you found one you like. Things can get very challenging when looking for a new home more so if you’re targeting buying a home in a hot neighbourhood. You need to be smart about your search and come up with a game plan for house-hunting success!

Below is our compilation of the top 10 house-hunting mistakes that you need to avoid.

Listening to Advisers Who Don’t Live With You

Input from some people is great, but not if they won’t be living with you anyway. Opinion from other people might confuse you and won’t really help you because they would often be speaking about their needs, not yours.

Going in with No Mortgage Pre-Approval

The last thing you want to convey when house-hunting is for real estate agents and home sellers to think that you’re not serious about your search. This can mean losing out to another buyer who can make a solid offer. More so, mortgage pre-approval lets you know exactly what you can afford.

Not Seizing the Moment

Go see a new listing if you’re interested. Waiting just a few hours can mean someone might beat you to it in a tight market.

Not Checking the Neighbourhood

How would you feel waking up to the neighbour’s loud drum practice on your first morning in your new home? How about having a hard time getting out in the morning because there is a school nearby and the street is filled with family vehicles and school buses? Always check the small details.

Getting a Crush on Sparkly New Features

Newly renovated and newly constructed homes have a tendency to make someone want to own them right off the bat, but you have to think that a home is more than new features! Note that most low-quality finishes and materials look great when new but are worthless in the long run.


Not Being Sure What You Want

You have to know what features you want before shopping for a home or you’ll risk not finding any or being overwhelmed with possible choices. This would save you time too by narrowing your search.


Being Mesmerized By Décor

Don’t forget to assess whether you’re just loving the staged decorations or the home itself. Unless the home sellers are going to leave everything with the house, you’ll end up with a shell that you’re not sure you like anyway.

Not Settling for Anything Less Than Absolute Perfection

Your 100% dream home may not exist, so why not consider one that ticks most of your boxes although not all of it? It’s easy to fall for thinking that something better will be available soon.


Not Taking Your Time in an Open House

You need to have a real feel of the house and explore it in detail before you make the decision of making an offer for it. Check nooks and crannies, open cabinets, use the bathroom, inspect the kitchen and so on. Make sure you don’t skip the basement and the attic!


Forgetting to Have An Agent

House-hunting in a hot market without an agent is a waste of time, energy, hope, and effort. Up your chances of sealing a deal by having an agent who can get you first dibs on new listings. Less negotiation error too!.Visit our website

 Article by Brad Miller, Realty Times

Posted in Buyer Info
Dec. 19, 2017

November 2017 Market Watch

Posted in Market Updates
Dec. 19, 2017

Home Improvements That Pay Off


Average return at resale: 100 percent

The average homeowner spends about $3,502 for landscaping and $1,465 on a designer, according to the American Nursery Landscape Association.

Not sure where to start? Local garden centers often offer free design services, or ask the neighbors what works for them.

Sod costs about 30 to 35 cents a square foot, so a 5,000 sq. ft. yard would cost about $1,500 to sod. Budget for delivery fee if you buy less than 1,000 sq. ft. of sod.

A splash of color at the front of the house is an eye-catching plus. For maximum impact, use one color and vary the height of plants.

If your doorway is overwhelmed by greenery, get out the shears. Replace overgrown shrubbery with flowering foundation plants, mixing heights and colors for dramatic effect.

A charming focal point like a walkway and fountain adds major value to your property. Roll a sealant on flagstones for a permanent wet look that enhances the color.

Exterior Improvements

(Vinyl Siding, Paint, Updated Front Entry)

Average return at resale: 95.5 percent

The average national cost to replace 1,250 sq. ft. of vinyl siding: $7,239. Average return: $6,914, with a recoup rate of 95.5 percent.

A gallon of paint covers 400 sq. ft. of house.

Paint color cards take the guesswork out of choosing the right color combination for doors, trim and siding.

If your house was painted before 1978, test for lead before sanding or scraping.

Upscale, fiber-cement siding costs $10,393 and returns $10,771 at resale, an even better recoup rate of 103.6 percent

If you need columns to hold up a pergola, purchase the load-bearing type. Fiberglass composite columns are popular and durable. Check salvage yards for unique historic columns.

For an updated look, remove old awnings from windows and doors.

Swap damaged wrought-iron railings for real wood supports for a more inviting entry.

Give a bare, charmless porch a dramatic makeover by adding a pergola and columns.


Minor Kitchen Remodel

Average return at resale: 98.5 percent

A minor kitchen remodel averages $14,913 for $14,691 at resale, a recoup rate of 98.5 percent. Do a minor remodel when your kitchen needs a cosmetic update and not a drastically different floor plan.

A $15,000 kitchen update covers 30 feet of re-facing for cabinets and drawers, a new wall oven, cooktop, sink and fixtures, laminate countertops and resilient flooring.

Put recessed lights 3’ to 5’ apart on center and 18″ from cabinets to light the countertops. Running the lights between two joists is easier than running through the joists.

If your home is worth more than $500,000, go with stone or trendy glass countertops.

Cover old vinyl with floor leveler so the pattern doesn’t bleed through. You can’t put a second layer of vinyl on if the subfloor is below-grade concrete.

Brighten up the kitchen by sanding and painting existing cabinets. It’s much less expensive than buying new ones.

Add decorator detail without the cost by changing drapes and window molding.

Minor Bathroom Remodel

Average return at resale: 102 percent

It costs about $10,500 to replace the tub, tile surround, floor, toilet, sink, vanity and fixtures. You’ll get back an average of $10,700 at resale, a recoup rate of 102 percent.

If you can pipe a child’s name on a birthday cake, you can re-caulk a tub. Use a softener like CAULK-BE-GONE to get rid of the old caulk. Fill the tub with water after you’re done to stretch caulk while it dries.

If your old tub is too large to fit out the door, re-glaze it for a like-new finish. Cost: $300 to $400.

Remove dated wall coverings and apply a fresh coat of paint. For damaged walls, spray-on texture provides quick coverage.

Replace old shower doors or remove them to add the illusion of space.


Major Bathroom Remodel

Average return at resale: 93.2 percent

A major bathroom remodel involves expanding an existing 5×7 ft. bathroom, relocating and replacing the tub and toilet and adding designer sinks and faucets, a linen closet, lighting, a ceramic tile floor and exhaust fan for a cost of $26,052, which brings in $24,286 at resale.

Start at the bottom. Replace old floors with fresh tile in ceramic or stone for a solid payoff. Buy extra tiles in case you break any during installation. Set some tiles aside at the end of the job for future repairs.

Give an old vanity a facelift with a new countertop for a clean, fresh look buyers will love.

Use eye-fooling tricks to make a small bath look larger. A new pedestal sink is a smart replacement for an old cabinet. The smaller footprint gives the illusion of space.


Attic Bedroom Conversion

Average return at resale: 93.5 percent

The average attic bedroom in a two- or three-bedroom house costs $39,188 and returns $36,649 at resale.

The best recoup rate is in the West: 105 percent; worst is in the Midwest: 82 percent.

That price includes a 15 x 15 ft. bedroom, a 5 x 7 ft. bath with shower, a 15 ft. dormer, four windows and a closet.

Add attic insulation to lower your utility bills. Making sure the foil vapor barrier is installed down toward the ceiling to prevent moisture from seeping up. Check the US Department of Energy website to see the right level of insulation for your area.

Can your existing HVAC system handle the load of another room? If not, factor in the cost of a second unit.

A solar-powered attic fan is an efficient way to save on cooling costs. The attic fan exhausts heat from above your home and is powered by a solar cell on the roof.


Deck, Patio or Porch Addition

Average return at resale: 90.3 percent

Adding a 16×20 ft. pressure-treated wood deck with a simple pattern costs about $11,000. At resale, you’ll get about $10,000 of that back, a recoup rate of 90 percent.

Add eye-appeal with decorative planters on the front porch, patio and decks.

Give a courtyard an impressive entry with an inviting gate, lighting and mature plantings. Small improvements will have a big impact at closing.

Use bold plantings to emphasize features, or to distract the eye from flaws.

Run-down stairs lower your profit margin, so make sure porch railings are safe and attractive.

Camouflage unattractive air conditioning units with a wooden trellis.

In the West, the recoup rate reaches nearly 100 percent, but it falls to 83 percent in the South.


10 Replacement Windows

Average return at resale: 89.6 percent

Replacing ten 3×5 ft. windows runs about $9,700. On average nationally, you’ll get back $8,700 when you sell, a recoup rate of nearly 90 percent.

Big city window replacements pay off. The average homeowner recoups more than she spends on replacement windows in San Francisco, Seattle, Orlando, Miami, Chicago, NYC and Boston.

For hot climates, there’s low-e glass that reflects heat. And for maximum efficiency, add argon gas inside the pane to prevent heat and cold transference within the window.


Family Room Addition

Average return at resale: 83 percent

The average family room addition costs $54,464 and adds $45,458 at resale, a recoup rate of 83 percent.

The highest recoup rates occur in high-cost Western markets.

A sunroom counts in the home’s square footage only when the room is heated and cooled for year-round use.

A sunroom adds value only in upscale neighborhoods. It won’t bring in higher bids in lower-end neighborhoods.

An addition shouldn’t be obvious. Make sure it has an open transition. A wider interior doorway and more substantial steps visually connect the addition to the rest of the house.


Living Room Updates – Decor

Average return at resale: 66 percent

It costs around $1,350 for staging and updating living room decor with new light switches, outlet covers, floor registers, crown molding, chair rails and drapes, plus fresh flowers and accessories.

Details add dollars. Crown molding gives a room a crisp, clean finish that buyers love. Choose molding that complements window trim and floorboards. Prices start at around $1.40 per linear foot.

Shift furniture away from the walls to make living rooms feel larger and more contemporary. Create a seating area around a feature you want buyers to notice, like a dramatic fireplace.

If you’re staging your home to sell, don’t move excess furniture and clutter into the garage. Rent a storage unit for about $1 per square foot per month.

New window treatments are a cost-conscious way to add a punch of designer color. For low ceilings, create the illusion of height by positioning drapes and valances higher on the wall.

Posted in Seller Info